Interview with Harper Bliss

Harper Bliss is an incredibly popular author of lesbian fiction and erotica with titles such as At the Water’s Edge, Seasons of Love and my personal favourite, Once in a Lifetime (and many more). She lives in Hong Kong with her wife, is also the co-founder of LadyLit Publishing and has the personal quest to be the most accessible author out there. 

Hi Harper! Thanks for the interview! Did you ever think that writing for fun would lead to your life today?

Thank you for having me. I certainly never believed it could be like this before the ebook revolution happened in 2011, which (lucky for me) coincided with me having lots of time to write due to my wife being relocated to Hong Kong for work. I’ve been doing this for 5 years now. Very amateurishly at first, and not making a lot of money. But even when I was only making a small amount each month, it was very encouraging because I could really see the potential. Now we both make a living off the best job in the world. It’s amazing and I’m very grateful.

As I understand it, you’re from Belgium. Have you ever had an issue with writing in English?

Yep. I’m from Belgium so English is not my native language. I grew up speaking Dutch, which is actually pretty close to English, meaning that it’s very easy for Dutch-speaking people to learn English. Belgium is a trilingual country (French and German being the other two official languages) where a lot of emphasis is put on learning languages from a young age. And one must never underestimate the power of subtitles when learning a language. Hearing the language while simultaneously reading translated subtitles throughout my teenage years has certainly contributed to my knowledge of the English language. Basically, you could say that I became fluent after watching Beverly Hills 90210. (It also helps that my wife is half-British and is very skilled at eliminating errors from my writing before it goes to the editor…) All of that being said, these days, I find it nearly impossible to write anything in Dutch. I live in Hong Kong, where I’m surrounded by English-speaking expats. I exclusively read in English (and have done so for a very long time). Though English will never be my first language, it has definitely become my language of choice.

Do you ever find it difficult juggling your marriage and your writing? I.e. Needing to write when your wife wants attention etc.

Not in the least. My wife has always been super supportive and now we run our publishing business together (and have done so for the past 2 years.) I only write in the morning anyway. She doesn’t want attention before noon. 😉 All jokes aside, writing and publishing is now both our full-time job. We’re in this together and we love it (we’re codependent lesbian like that.)

How come you decided to create LadyLit publishing rather than going the self-publishing route?

There was a time when I had a dream of becoming this amazing publisher of lesfic. Until I learned that running a publishing house is a lot of extra work that takes away a lot of time from writing. We closed for submissions about a year and a half ago to focus solely on Harper Bliss books and it has certainly been a good decision, not only for our bottom line, but even more so for our peace of mind. Being responsible for other authors’ success in publishing is extremely stressful. I have nothing but respect for houses like Ylva, Bella and Bold Strokes, who make a big difference to authors who don’t want to go indie (it’s not for everyone), but I’m glad I don’t have that responsibility anymore. Ladylit is still our company and will continue to be so, but for the foreseeable future we will only use it to publish Harper Bliss titles (and hopefully a couple of new pen names soon.)

Do you have daily goals for writing? 

I do, but consistency has always been my greatest enemy. Though, and I might be jinxing it by saying this, I think I finally cracked it. (It only took me 5 years.) Ever since I started writing seriously, I’ve dreamed of a regular routine, perhaps not daily, but at least on weekdays. The problem I’ve always had is that I dream too big. I set myself outrageous daily word count goals, only to end up terribly unmotivated when I can’t reach them, then start taking days off… that kind of predictable slippery slope. Since about a month or 2, I’ve been writing consistently between 8AM and 10AM. Being a fast writer, I can get between 2.000 and 3.000 words done daily. So that’s my goal (as opposed to the 6.000 words days I used to aim for.) I’ve always known consistency is more sustainable than binging, and it looks like I can finally make it work now.

Do you have a favourite among your own novels/short stories?

I think my best book is my latest release In the Distance There Is Light. It’s fairly controversial. And I’ve learned that my writing can really thrive on topics like that. I have written fairly straight-forward lesbian romances before, but they will never be my own favourites. I like big drama and emotional sex scenes and impossible situations. In the Distance has all of that in spades.

Out of all characters you have ever created, do you have any favourites?

That’s like asking about my favourite child! I’ll attempt an answer, anyway. 😉 I’ve always had a huge soft spot for Alice, the main character in Seasons of Love. She’s a pretty uptight, very British solicitor going through a midlife crisis and I love her transformation throughout the book—during which she falls in love with a much younger woman, who is also her best friend’s daughter. It’s funny because I always believed the power lesbian characters I created like Dominique Laroche in French Kissing or Isabella in High Rise would stay with me much longer as my favorites, but it turns out Alice McAllister is much more interesting as a character.

What kind of writing process do you have? Do you plan the whole story first or do you like to see where it takes you?

I write romance, so, at its most basic, the story will always be the same: two women meet, like each other, encounter a few obstacles, overcome them, and have a happy ending. I guess, for this reason, I’m not much of a plotter. I’m also very bad at knowing in advance what will happen. What I like to do instead is create complex, layered characters who are unpredictable, even to me as their creator, that drive the story forward. That being said, I would like to be more of a plotter, because when I know exactly what’s going to happen, I can write much faster.

Very soon, my wife and I will be trying our hand at writing a thriller together, and a book in that genre requires a whole lot more plotting than I’m used to. We’ve been planning this book for weeks now and, at times, it’s been a bit of a painful process for me, but I think the end result will be all the better for it (and my wife happens to pretty good at coming up with murderous plots!)

Do you read nonfiction books about writing?

All the time. I would definitely recommend Stephen King’s On Writing, just to get you started. I also listen to a few weekly podcasts (The Creative Penn, Self-Publishing Podcast & The Self-Publishing Formula) about writing and publishing and pick up a lot of tips there. We’ve also been doing James Patterson’s Masterclass in writing, which is quite interesting (though not very detailed.) I think I must have also read every book available about speeding up your writing, but they all say the same, just as any book on craft will, essentially, say the same. But it’s good to be reminded sometimes.

What are you currently working on right now?

I just typed ‘The End’ underneath the first draft of Pink Bean Book Two. The jury’s still out on the title, so I can’t give you that just yet. It will be out just before Christmas on 23 December 2016. Now that that’s done, my wife and I can finally start writing our thriller (about time after all that plotting!)

You can find Harper on her website or on her other social media

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In defence of coincidences…

Sometimes you read a story where something happens and you just think to yourself: “No way this could happen! It’s just too much of a coincidence.”Most of the time I agree with you. I want to read believable stories or at least for the writer to convince me. But sometimes strange things happen. Just like that.

Let me show what I mean.

Story number one:

The first one involves my cousin-in-law (fine, my wife’s cousin, you know what I mean). He is from Brazil, just like her, but has been living in London for the past ten or so years. He was taking the tube back home from the gym one night, wearing shorts in spite of the November cold. He hears behind him two people talking in Portuguese, saying how he is crazy for wearing shorts. This man, being who he is, strikes up a conversation for them. “Oh you’re also from Brazil?” They’re all from Brazil. All fine and dandy. “So what town are you from?” “Wow, Salvador?” They all come from the same city? Sure I can buy it. “So which part of town?” Now I don’t remember what the part of town is called but it was the same. They laugh. “So what building?”

Soooo… it turns out these two people lived in the apartment underneath the one where wife’s cousin had lived!

I mean, what are the odds?

Story number two:

My wife was going to fly from Brazil to Britain where we lived a few years ago. She was going to change flights in both Lisbon and London, like one does. Her father tells her, “oh, my cousin is flying to Portugal this month, maybe you’ll meet her!” My wife, being the cynic she is, probably replied something like “yeah, sure, out of all the flights in all of August, I’ll probably see her.”

Now, wife (well, she was girlfriend then, but you know) didn’t even know her father’s cousin. They’d never even met before.

The day comes, she boards the flight with assistance (we were minors then) and the flight attendant take her to her seat, says her full name and gives her some information. Once she leaves, the woman in the seat next to her opens her mouth. Of course it’s the dad’s cousin. She brought out family photos and apparently talked all the way to Portugal.

 

 


Sure, this is all anecdotal, but all stories like these are. And haven’t we all encountered strange coincidences to certain degrees?

Now maybe how the characters in my newest story “Under the Fallen Star” meet is too coincidental, too strange, too perfect. But I stand by it. In my world, it’s within the realm of possibilities.

How did they meet, you ask? Well, I’m not completely ready to share that with you yet. But soon enough you’ll know, don’t worry.

Update

IMG_20160924_222555.jpg

Hi guys!

As you’ve probably noticed I haven’t been active here for the last couple of months. I’m still writing, but much less than before I started working. I’m now lying on the sofa, recovering from the flu and thought I would give a general update on what I’ve been up to.

Mainly, I’m working now. And to be honest, I’ve been struggling a little bit for different reasons. I don’t want to go into it but some days I haven’t been able to write anything. Not blog posts, not short stories and definitely not anything longer. I’m picking it up, slowly but surely and writing still has my heart. But I don’t have time and energy for everything I want to do.

The good news is that I have recieved the final beta reading on my novella “Out of Hand” which I hope to self-publish in January (more on that at a later time) and that I’m almost done with the first draft of my other novella called “Under the Fallen Star”.

Once I’m done with that I’m planning to finally finish up the next installment of “Never Break a Leg Before Christmas.”

In the meantime enjoy the photo of my dog, Einstein. 😀

 

Dear past self…

It gets better.

Today I ran my fastest kilometer ever and it felt absolutely amazing. As I was feeling the world rush by, I couldn’t help but think back to just four years ago.

I can imagine the girl that I was, 22, run into the ground. When I was 22 I was… sad. I don’t want to say depressed because I never received any diagnosis nor did I seek help for it, but I was numb and completely empty inside. I cried every night. My body continued without me as I got up every day, as I cooked and cleaned, as I took care of my unwell girlfriend, as I listened to my mother cry every single day on the phone, as I worked part time and studied full time, as I counted every penny and knew that even if I cut myself in two and sold half we couldn’t afford food. Hardly rent. So I worked more. More money. Less time. But at least I didn’t have to stare at the tomatoes and cucumber and know that I had to choose. I couldn’t afford both.

And friends? I wasn’t too liked at my uni. We lived in the north and I was from the south. I didn’t speak like them. I didn’t know the area like them. I was isolated on the island we had created, far away from any friends and family. My girlfriend and I. Not really Swedish. We had only been in this country, my country, for two years. And I hated it. I missed Britain. I wished I hadn’t left the country I had lived my whole adult life in.

But at 22 I went back to writing. I had written earlier of course, but between the ages of 19 and 22 I wrote nothing. I didn’t have any words. But suddenly they came back with a vengeance. I wrote to feel something. To find myself again. To find the spark that had been killed as I had lost myself years before.

So I went looking. I went looking for the 17-year-old who had left home, fresh-faced and naive. I didn’t know the girl I had used to be anymore, all I knew was that she had died in Britain. She had died so that I could be born and at 22 I didn’t know who I was yet. I have tried telling people this. But they always say “you’re always so happy” and I guess I was always happy. I had the world on my shoulders and a smile on my lips. I was good at pretending.

I used to feel sorry for myself. Not the 22-year-old me, but the Kathy who was a teenager. The 18-year-old who lived alone in a cold flat in a little British town. No hot water. I boiled water on the stove to wash my clothes in the bathtub. The building I lived in was situated between three pubs and I would lay awake in my bed listening to the roars and shouts of the drunk people downstairs. In the winter my flat was so cold I would go to bed at 6 PM just to get warm again. Double trousers, jumper, cover and blanket. And I learned. I learned to cook, and after the skin fell of my hands I learned not to wash my clothes without plastic gloves.

But at the same time I lost myself.

I wanted to hug little me, and tell her that it’ll be okay and that I’m so sorry she had to die.

But everyone has to grow up sometime.

At 22 I changed. I found writing again, and a friend was nice enough to send me Jae’s Backwards to Oregon. Then several of Gil McKnight’s books. Which introduced me to lesbian fiction.

And I found myself again. My girlfriend stopped sleeping so much. We moved back south and I started studying here instead. I started believing in myself. I started running. I’m asthmatic and sometimes I thought I would die. But I ran. And I wrote. And I read. And I lived.

I don’t live by my past anymore. I don’t need every difficult thing to be a part of my identity and I have restored the connection with the girl I was. And now?

Now I’m married. We have two dogs. I have graduated and I have a wonderful job waiting for me that I’m starting on Monday. And this week I published my first novel.

And today I ran my fastest kilometer ever.

 

Before the Emergency

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Author note:

The story you’re about to read is not a story like my usual stories. It’s possible to read it as a standalone story, but otherwise it’s about the main protagonists that you will meet in my first novel “State of Emergency” which is to be published later this week. It contains snippets on how Mercedes and Idun fell in love. 

Cover is by the talented Deniz Pekin.

Beta read by my dear friends K and Narcosynthesis.

Continue reading

… and they called it puppy love

“Rae?”

The soft voice by her door made Rae lift her head. She had ignored the earlier yells from somewhere in the house, but her homework wasn’t interesting enough to ignore Leone looking at her shyly.

“Can I come in?”

Why are you here? Leone had never visited her room like this before.

 Rae nodded and moved her chair back so there was enough room for Leone to come inside the tiny bedroom. “Of course it is.”

Continue reading

State of Emergency Teaser

Today I’d love to share a small segment from my novel “State of Emergency” that’s going to be published on August 10.


“Idun! Thank God!”

It didn’t matter that Idun was tired and slightly groggy from the pain pills; she would recognize her sister’s voice anywhere.

 “Jo! Hey! What’s up?” She felt a twinge of guilt for not calling her sister for so long. Did Jo even know about Idun’s accident? I doubt Mercedes called and told her. Idun scoffed.

“Look, I don’t have much time. It’s very important that you listen to me now.”

Idun’s eyebrows knitted and she sat up to be able to focus. Sudden pain reminded her that she couldn’t yet move freely and she took Mercedes’ pillow and pressed it against her abdomen with her free hand.

“I’m listening.”

“Some bad things are going to happen and soon; I’m breaking more rules than I can count telling you this, but I couldn’t bear something happening to you.”

Idun hugged the pillow closer.

“You’re scaring me.”

“Good. I need you to hide. Don’t come out no matter what you hear. Not if someone calls for you, not if someone knocks on the door. Just stay away from the windows and hide. I’ll see if…” The call dropped.

“Jo? JO?” Idun looked at the phone. She couldn’t even call back since Jo had called from a private number. What is happening? She quickly called Mercedes’s number, her heart beating in her throat.

As the phone kept ringing and it became clear that nobody on the other end was picking up, Idun felt her throat turn dry; Mercedes always answered her calls.


What do you guys think?

10 Funny Book Dedications That Actually Got Published

This is so funny…

Books Rock My World

I love reading book dedications! Often, it is our first touch with an author. it is intimate to read those words that often show what they truly cherish in life, what they hope for the book, what they hold dear.

But sometimes, authors get bold, and instead of constructing a “proper” dedication, they write words that are unorthodox, honest and often humorous. Here are 10 of dedications like that!

  1. The Selection” by Kiera Cass
    hidad
  2. “Psychos: A White Girl Problems Book” by Babe Walker
    Strongest-Person
  3. An Introduction To Algebraic Topology” by Joseph J. Rotman
    book-dedication
  4. “The House of Hades” by Rick Riordan
    cliffhanger
  5. “My Shit Life So Far” by Frankie Boyle
    destroy
  6. “Austenland” by Shannon Hale
    colin_0
  7. “The Land Of Stories” by Chris Colfer
    af9ab3836bc0550c1df852c73d669790
  8. “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain
    IMG_4403
  9. “No Thanks” by E.E. Cummings
    ee_cummings
  10. “Post Office” by Charles Bukowski
    IMG_4404

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